Who Invented Quartz Watches?

Are you watch-enthusiast?

If yes, I bet that you have owned a quartz watch already, even several ones.

Quartz watches catch a lot of attention thanks to its accuracy, durability, and cheap price.

However, who invented quartz watches is still a mystery to some of you, right?

Don’t worry.

Take a seat and scroll down this article for accurate information.

Related:

Who Invented Quartz Watches?

When it comes to the history of a quartz watch, there are lots of remarkable milestones that you should pay attention to.

In 1880, Pierre Curie and Jacques, who were French physicists, first discovered that quartz had piezoelectricity properties.

Nearly fifty years later, the first version of the quartz clock was made by the combined efforts between J. W. Horton and Warren Marrison. Specifically, they all examined the quartz crystal oscillator.

After that, quartz clocks were continually studied and regarded as the standard of precise time in many laboratory settings.

Until 1967, the prototype of the Beta 1quartz wristwatch was revealed by the Swiss Centre Electronique Horloge.

And Seiko also introduced the first commercial quartz wristwatch in the world to the public at the end of 1969 after discovering the fluctuation of quartz in the clock cycle successfully since 1958.

Since the 1980s, quartz technology has dominated the watch industry as well as applications, including an alarm clock, kitchen timer, you name it.

As a result, it resulted in a quartz crisis in the watchmaking.

Compared to the mechanical watch, a quartz one is much more accurate, durable, and rugged.

Most notably, the United States and Japan took the lead with several huge watch factories by the early 21st century.

Until now, the quartz watches have still gained popularity and caught every watch lover’s eyes.

Wrapping up

Have you found out the answer to your query “Who invented quartz watches” yet?

We do hope that our article will be useful enough to broaden your knowledge of the history of quartz watches.

And you can be more interested in the watch world as a result.

Further:

A Concise History of the Quartz Watch Revolution